10 travel trends to watch out for in 2020

| December 27, 2019

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As a new year and a new decade approach, travel experts have been weighing in on the trends that they think will shape the industry in the months ahead. We’ve waded through their predictions and singled out the ones that we think sound the most likely. Here are 10 to look out for over the next 12 months.

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Tauck

Tauck is the world-leader in upscale, escorted travel. The company leverages its 90 years of experience to deliver over 125 distinctive and enriching land journeys, small ship cruises, river cruises, safaris, Tauck Bridges family travel adventures and immersive Tauck Culturious trips designed for “culturally curious” boomer-age travelers.

OTHER ARTICLES

Travel Trends 2020 — Technology

Article | March 9, 2020

Technology’s a double-edged sword, and it will just get sharper. On one hand, it’s wonderful to have a complete toolbox in one hand (camera, photo library and editor, tickets and itinerary, currency converter, maps and navigation) and access to the wider online world. On the other, it will become even more a DIY world. Not connecting to the cloud? Well you’ll have to Google the issue and fix that. Contacts not loading? Same. Check in online, get to the airport, fix your bag tags and put them on the belt. Tech will become better and more frustrating all at the same time in 2020 and beyond.

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Poor payment experience determines choice of travel provider

Article | March 9, 2020

Payments are now accepted as one of the areas adding friction to the traveler journey, from the booking process to being on a trip, according to new research. The Frictionless Travel Payments: From Complexity To Competitive Advantage report from Amadeus shows that 70% of consumers say a good payment experience would drive them to select a travel provider over a competitor. In addition, 74% say a poor payment experience affects the enjoyment of their holiday. The study also reveals that 74% of travelers are booking less than two months before departure and millennials are twice as likely to book later than those aged over 55.

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Here’s What Will Happen Next to Corporate Airfares

Article | March 9, 2020

To paint a picture of what corporate airfares will look like once planes return to the skies is becoming more difficult by the day — if not impossible. Airlines, for one, have more pressing matters to deal with as they fight for survival during the ongoing crisis. Most in the U.S. will be working through the fine print of the $2 trillion U.S. stimulus package that throws them a lifeline of $50 billion in grants and loans. Other carriers, particularly in Europe and Asia, have already downsized and furloughed most of their workforce and are now turning to refinancing. Cases in point include Air France-KLM, which is now looking for $6.5 billion in state-backed loans, while last week Singapore Airlines revealed it had secured $13 billion in new funding.

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Where are the new openings for startups in the travel industry?

Article | March 9, 2020

The travel and tourism sector is estimated to be worth a huge $8.8 trillion every year, according to the World Travel and Tourism Council. Along with established players, the industry has an incredibly vibrant startup scene full of companies looking to disrupt the status quo and capture a slice of the travel industry pie. The investment capital is there, as we know, with Phocuswright’s latest State of Travel Startups report revealing $5.8 billion was invested in travel startups in 2018. So, I want to home in on three key areas where there are still plenty of opportunities for startup innovation and look at some of the exciting things that are already happening in those segments.

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Spotlight

Tauck

Tauck is the world-leader in upscale, escorted travel. The company leverages its 90 years of experience to deliver over 125 distinctive and enriching land journeys, small ship cruises, river cruises, safaris, Tauck Bridges family travel adventures and immersive Tauck Culturious trips designed for “culturally curious” boomer-age travelers.

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