How to Make Money on Those YouTube Videos You Love To Share

Sophia caraballo | May 27, 2019

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Whether it's by reviewing products, teaching people a specific skill, or playing video games, hundreds of people have figured out how to make money on YouTube.These days, making a career on YouTube is a viable option because more people are choosing to stream videos on their phones rather than watch network television. And although it’s not the norm, Forbes reports that some YouTube celebrities, like Jeffree Star, rack up to $18 million a year just from their YouTube channels.Though it may not be worth quitting your job over, you can still use YouTube as a side hustle. This all depends on how you manage your channel and if you take advantage of all the ways that YouTube can increase your revenue. It all starts with great content. Similar to any job, you have to think about what makes you stand out from other people uploading content. Are you a great knitter? Do you love to travel the world? Are you really good at video games? If so, start recording and get every one of your friends to support you by subscribing and watching your videos.

Spotlight

ALTOUR

With sales of $2.6 billion in 2016, ALTOUR is one of the largest travel management companies in the United States and one of the largest travel management companies globally. Serving the corporate and leisure luxury and mid-markets and entertainment community, ALTOUR has 62 offices and more than 1,500 travel professionals worldwide. In addition to travel management services, ALTOUR companies include ALTOUR Air, SwiftTrip, ALTOUR Meetings and Incentives and the ALTOUR Global Network.

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Spotlight

ALTOUR

With sales of $2.6 billion in 2016, ALTOUR is one of the largest travel management companies in the United States and one of the largest travel management companies globally. Serving the corporate and leisure luxury and mid-markets and entertainment community, ALTOUR has 62 offices and more than 1,500 travel professionals worldwide. In addition to travel management services, ALTOUR companies include ALTOUR Air, SwiftTrip, ALTOUR Meetings and Incentives and the ALTOUR Global Network.

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