CWT adds messaging service for travelers, ponders adding voice tech

PhocusWire | February 13, 2020

Business travel management company CWT has launched a messaging service within its myCWT platform. The technology enables travelers to contact a counselor at any time of the day via desktop, mobile or a third party messaging app approved by their employer. Travelers can make bookings, amend or cancel existing trips and retrieve itineraries via the messaging service, which also enables counselors to see the history of a traveler’s interactions. The technology can also be integrated with existing messaging interfaces such as Skpe and Teams.

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A graphic account of lost baggage across international airports. Showcasing the reasons for lost baggage, the cost, the amount per region and airport size.

Spotlight

A graphic account of lost baggage across international airports. Showcasing the reasons for lost baggage, the cost, the amount per region and airport size.

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