Traveleads named official travel partner for major energy industry event

Energy Voice | January 16, 2020

Traveleads, which last year opened an office in Aberdeen to support a growing energy client base, is the recommended travel company for travelling delegates attending the event at P&J Live in the summer. With more than 1000 expected delegates attending from across the UK and around the world, Traveleads will provide the EIC team and visitors with dedicated travel management support. Group Sales Director, Sally Cassidy said: “We are thrilled to partner with leading trade association EIC and are looking forward to building this relationship within the energy sector.  Traveleads has been in business for 49 years and we bring a wealth of corporate business travel experience and expertise which EEC attending delegates are sure to benefit from.

Spotlight

Everyone loves to travel. However, travel planning and booking have seen a remarkable transformation in the last decade or so. Whether it’s travelling for business or leisure, the modern customer prefers a more sybaritic and personalized travel experience. Thus, it has become extremely important for travel agencies to remain relevant to tech and social media savvy travellers (and also to the traditional customers who are getting accustomed to the rising trend) who are slowly and steadily shifting to online planning and booking.

Spotlight

Everyone loves to travel. However, travel planning and booking have seen a remarkable transformation in the last decade or so. Whether it’s travelling for business or leisure, the modern customer prefers a more sybaritic and personalized travel experience. Thus, it has become extremely important for travel agencies to remain relevant to tech and social media savvy travellers (and also to the traditional customers who are getting accustomed to the rising trend) who are slowly and steadily shifting to online planning and booking.

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